The Kosher Gastronome

Livin' the kosher dream

Leek Fritters

IMG_8815

I was trying to figure out a way to incorporate some of simanim into our meal for Rosh Hashanah, and got this idea from Pragmatic Attack, another kosher blog, and also a Jets fan, although I don’t know if that’s something we want to bring up nowadays…sigh…All right, back to food…at least food doesn’t lose to the Ravens, while I’m constantly surrounded by these annoying Ravens fans…but I digress.

IMG_8807

I really wanted to call this post “allium fritters” because I basically had an allium family reunion in the pot with this one, but I didn’t…good story huh? You see, when I saw the idea for leek fritters, I thought to myself, why stop at leeks? Let’s go with total allium domination. Alliums are a family of plants that include: onions, shallots, leeks, scallions, and garlic among other stuff, so I figured let’s combine it all together, and make the craziest fritter ever…and you know what I did? Just that.

First a word from out sponsor – Mr Leek. Leeks have that oniony taste, but a little more mild, but did you ever notice every recipe that you ever see with leeks calls for them to be rinsed clean? Well the reason is, as leeks grow, the farmer continuously kicks dirt over it to cover more of it (called “hilling”), so the dirt gets in between the layers.

IMG_3853

That’s also why the top half or so is greener than the bottom half, because sun produces chlorophyll, which is green and bitter for that matter, and why we discard that half of the leek, and, full circle, why mr farmer kicks dirt on the leek to cover it. Huray for science!

Anyway, start by cutting up your alliums (are you sick of that word yet? because I am), and sautee the leeks, onion, and shallots in the oil until they’re translucent and tender, about 5 minutes.

IMG_8810

Then add the minced garlic, and cook for another minute. Remove the whole shebang from the heat, and allow to cool. At the last minute, I decided the scallions would be better off raw, and not sauteed, so I combined it with the cooked onions.

IMG_8812

Then added flour, salt, black and white pepper, to taste, and added the eggs, and mixed it all together.

IMG_8814

I then heated up some oil in a skillet, and dropped in spoon fulls of the batter to cook them…kind of like latkes. I fried them for about 2 minutes per side, and allowed them to drain on a paper towel lined plate.

Until next time.

Leek (Allium) Fritters

adapted from Pragmatic Attack

Ingredients:

  • About 1 pound of mixed alliums (geez! enough) – leeks, onions, shallots, scallions, garlic
  • Vegetable oil
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 3 eggs, beaten

Directions:

  1. Chop up your veggies, and heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium heat, and sautee the leeks, onions, and shallots, until they become translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the minced garlic, and sautee for another minute.
  2. Remove from fire, and add them all to a bowl, and allow to cool, and add the chopped scallions.
  3. When cool, combine flour, salt, and white and black pepper adjusting seasoning to taste, and add eggs, and mix to combine.
  4. Heat up about 1/3-2/3 cups of oil in a skillet over medium-low heat, and drop in the batter by the spoon full and fry for about 2 minutes per side.
  5. Drain on a paper towel lined plate.
About these ads

12 responses to “Leek Fritters

  1. Phoenix Fresser October 5, 2011 at 11:58 am

    The Y’hi Ratzon for leeks is “yikrisu Sonainu” (our enemies should be cut off).
    Is that the reason they are swimming in oil as well, because frying is the enemy? :)

  2. Phoenix Fresser October 5, 2011 at 12:01 pm

    Omn a more serious note, here is a great tip for cleaning leeks:
    Make a deep horizontal and vertical cut (a tzelem, gasp!) into the top of the leek. This will cause the leek to open, like a broom. Holding the leek from the bottom, swish it in a bowl of cool water. The sand will come out quite well.
    Another tip is Trader Joe’s – their leeks are pre-trimmed and quite clean.

  3. pragmaticattic October 5, 2011 at 9:25 pm

    I like the idea of mixing up the leeks with shallots, garlic, scallions, onions–the fritters look really good. I could eat a whole batch of leek fritters all by myself.
    G’mar Chatima Tova! (and thanks for the link. Let’s hope things turn around for the Jets.)

  4. SaraK October 6, 2011 at 3:07 pm

    I made a great salad with spinach, pomegranate (2 simanim) and roasted sweet potato. Was a huge hit. E mail me if you want the recipe.

  5. Tali Simon @ More Quiche, Please November 29, 2011 at 6:00 am

    Mmmm. I’ve made latkes (um, fritters?) with sweet potatoes, parsnips, carrots, and zucchinis (not necessarily in the same batter!) but never with leeks. Sounds great.

    • thekoshergastronome November 29, 2011 at 7:52 am

      Thanks…to me latkes is only potatoes, everything else just isn’t a latke…it’s a latke wanna-be, so I’ll call them fritters…although technically a fritter is a batter based fried whatchamackalet, and I don’t know if this meets that qualification, but I’m not really sure what else to call them (and no! not latkes ;))

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: